Nanna Prieler’s Abstracted Limbs and Inventive Characters

Nanna Prieler’s character’s are unrestrained by which way they bend or how they slot together. The freedom she allows them gives them the flexibility to match the fun and cheekiness of her colours and compositions.

NANNA-illustration-for a-colouring-book-for-adults

The way that Nanna likes to keep trying new things means that her work is always inventive, giving us a fresh take on some of the themes that she continues to explore. From choppy forms to abstracted limbs, Nanna mixes it up by adding an extra little flavour each time.

As she explains below, however, each illustration always starts with hashing it out on the page. The experimentation with form and texture is just the final topping, with her expression coming through being the most important result.

NANNA-illustration-for-die-Welt-about the investment legend Bill Miller

My work is a mix of handmade and digital. But the sketch is the heart of every illustration, and the most time-consuming part as well. I always try to draw very openly and love to test new pens and papers. Creating new things is so much fun!

For me, it’s very important that the illustration comes from the heart and that the viewer can see that.

I use a drawing tablet and the computer to go over the sketches. With Photoshop, I can choose the final colours, and insert my own, typical structures. The structure is handmade as well, with roller and acrylic colour. 

NANNA-Animal-pattern

NANNA-Illustration-man-vs-crab

NANNA-Illustration-My-favourite-waste-of-time

NANNA Illustration for die Welt about opportunities and risks in the real estate sector

NANNA sketchbook in Norway

NANNA sketchbook in Berlin

NANNA workspace

NANNA portrait

© Nanna Prieler, 2015

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