Powerful Simplicity in Minimalist Illustrations by Timothy Hunt

Carefully stripping a composition of its superfluous elements and bringing the attention to its core is a speciality of skilfully minimalist illustrator, Timothy Hunt. We had a chat with him about this bold and simple aesthetic to find out how it developed and what influenced his style.

The fewer the pieces, the harder it is to shuffle them around and find the right balance. It takes an incredible attention to detail and eye for subtle shifts and changes, but it’s something that Timothy is able to do so well in his work.

Below, he answers a few questions about his inspiration, style, and some of his favourite projects that he’s worked on to date.

Please tell us about yourself and the kind of work you do.

My name is Tim, I’m based in Yorkshire, UK. I work as an illustrator, but that also includes or in my opinion comes under graphic designer.

You describe yourself as liking to use “simple shapes and bold colours”. What do you think it is that gravitates you towards working in this way.

I think it’s really because that’s the kind of work that really stands out to me personally and the kind of work I enjoy looking at, I’ve read and heard a lot recently about the way we are inspired and basically take things and remake it, I think that’s true and think the things we take are the bits we like.

Do you start with as few marks as possible or find yourself editing down a lot to get the end effect?

I start by sketching and try and get close to a final drawing that I can then work to the finished piece, so I’d say I have an idea of exactly what I want in there in the first place really, some bits can be added though, but I would always go back to the sketch and and work that on paper first.

I think over the years I have realised more and more that this part of my process is really vital, it’s not just enjoyable but it makes the flow of working much easier and less frustrating at the final stages.

What are some of the other key stages in working through a project for you?

Like I just mentioned, the key really is to get the idea on paper and for it to resemble what I have in my mind, maybe not at first but I like to take the time to keep redrawing if necessary until I’m happy with what I have.

This is basically the opposite of how I used to work in the beginning or at college, the emphasis was always on the computer and working digitally, I have come to realise that is really the wrong way for me to work.

What do you find inspires your work?

I would have to say it’s a mixture of all the things I like, going back to what I was saying earlier, I think I tend pick up on things I like and maybe it goes it to my work in some way.

What have been some of your favourite projects to work on so far?

I sometimes work with a graphic designer in Paris called Pascal BLUA, I really enjoy working with him, I enjoy any project with him because of his excellent direction but also freedom to express your own ideas and style.

Did you make any kind of work related goals for the new year?

I didn’t really, just to keep going really and try my best and try to love each project and get the best out of it.

Are there any upcoming projects we should keep an eye out for?

I have been working on a children’s book, so hopefully you’ll be seeing some of that. Fingers crossed.

© Timothy Hunt, 2016

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