A Dreamy Collection of Ideas in a 30-Day Animation by Ashleigh Green

For Ashleigh Green, ’30 Days of Animation’ started as a simple exercise in motivation and encouraging a creativity. But looking back, the process of creating a short animation every day for a month inherently captured more than she had been aware of at the time.

As the name suggests, Ashleigh created a short, animated clip each day of the 30 days that the project covered. Compiled together, they form a beautiful collection of thoughts and a day-dreamy, uplifting little film.

But as she tells us below, the process had also picked up imprints of how she had been feeling and in some ways become an emotional document of sorts along the way.

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I’m an illustrator, graphic designer, and self-taught animator. My personal work explores change, place, memory, and new perspectives.

I began the 30 Days of Animation to experiment and get into the routine of producing personal work daily. I’ve always wanted to create a short animated film. This project is the first step towards realizing my goal.

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Each animation began as a sketch on paper. Some days this was a challenge; it’s difficult to produce creative work when you’re not feeling creative. I learned to pay attention to this and kept track of when I felt most creative to structure my days accordingly.

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I also allowed myself plenty of time to sketch and play with ideas before choosing a concept to animate. This encouraged a greater production of ideas, sometimes resulting in a few days’ worth of animation concepts from just one brainstorming session.

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Over the 30 days I learned a lot about my process and what I like to animate. I loved watching relaxed doodles become polished moving pieces.

I found that producing and sharing work daily was highly motivating and encouraged me to try new ideas that I may not have pushed myself to explore otherwise.28-herb-garden

Looking back on individual pieces, I can see certain thoughts and feelings I was experiencing at the time of creating the work.

This was an unexpected outcome, as I didn’t view the animation process as an emotional outlet until reflection.

Ultimately I feel much more comfortable animating and am eager to produce more personal work.

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© Ashleigh Green, 2016

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