Catch Up: An Increase in Exhibitions and Shaking Things Up with Scott Balmer

Since we last spoke with Scott Balmer three years ago, he’s seen an interesting shift in the kinds of places his work has taken him. He tells us more about this and ways in which he’s been pushing his style and technique.

Scott Balmer - doom

Possibly because of his distinctive homages to popular icons and the seeming growth in popularity of thematic illustration group shows, Scott has been seeing more and more interest in his work from exhibtions in the US.

It’s nice to think that this might be part of a more general shift for illustration, which has always balanced itself on the fence between gallery walls and its commercial applications.

Below, Scotts goes into more detail as well as giving us an idea of the tools and processes that have helped him evolve his work.

Scott Balmer - short fuse

Not much has changed since the last time we talked, I have been doing the odd editorial as well as other things such as having some of my work in a few books.

I have seen a large increase in the amount of exhibitions that come my way with the majority being held in America. I find it kind of strange in a way that I’ve done more exhibition work there than I have here in the UK but that’s the way its panned out.

Scott Balmer - WestWorld

I still go into making images guns a’blazing as in I usually just jump right in though I do make the odd thumbnail to make sure that the concept works and that all elements fit together.

Thinking of the big changes to the way I produce my work has come in the form of getting my hands on some new toys such as the Cintiq display and also using custom made brushes like those made by Kyle T Webster and Frenden.

revenant-1000x1000

Working between a mixture of apps, I’ve been able create pieces with some nice textures and line work giving my work a more organic feel. I have been experimenting more with making complex imagery while in other images, stripping things back to its bare minimum such as with my recently resurrected vector work.

Scott Balmer - flint

The idea to keep elements to its most absolute basic shapes has resulted in the vector work’s focus to be all about the concept and less about the detail.

I still think it’s best to shake things up visually whether it’s big or small as long as you are still experimenting.

Scott Balmer - big-trouble-in-little-china

Scott Balmer - IMG_1451

© Scott Balmer, 2016

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