A Fascinating Look into the Developmental Process with Łukasz Drzycimski

Łukasz Drzycimski’s work is very much driven by the process he has developed over the years.

By exploring different techniques, he has consciously tried to find the most suitable way of working specific to what he needs and to give him the most creative freedom.

It’s interesting to hear how much consideration and introspection Łukasz has gone through to bring him to a point where his artistic output truly represents who he is and the kind of work he wants to be creating.

His work is so distinctive and full of originality that it makes sense that it has taken a focused effort of self-understanding to get him to this point.

Łukasz was kind enough to talk to us about this in great detail and is a fascinating peek behind the curtain at the evolution of his process.

“My name is Łukasz Drzycimski and I’m a Polish graphic designer and illustrator.”

“I used to start each piece of illustration with a pencil and piece of paper— it can’t get more basic and traditional than this.”

“Although, as I assume, most illustrators would probably find that kind of situation liberating and of unlimited possibilities.”

“For me, it would very often produce a very completely opposite effect of a debilitating nature.”

“A much as I respect and enjoy getting my hands dirty with ink or paint, I could finally start creating without any inhibitions only when I gravitated towards working strictly digitally on my iPad.”

“I guess it’s crucial to find the medium that suits you best before you can start discovering your own artistic voice and aesthetics— a stage I feel I have finally reached.”

“Most of the time, I get inspired by a single line, dot or scribble. That’s how most of my work usually begins— with an accidental stroke.”

“The most amazing thing while working on an illustration is that you begin in one place and sometimes end up on the opposite side of the galaxy.”

“I love mixing and sampling my work— it’s surprising how two completely different drawings made over a long period of time can complement and enrich one another.”

“I’m an advocate for simplicity and don’t like overdoing my work. When it’s simple but intriguing, every viewer— depending on his or her knowledge, experience and sensibility— might draw a different conclusion or story from a single piece.”

“Plurality of meaning and interpretation is what I most value in illustration.”

Above photo ©️ Mariana Alvarez Cortes

All images © Łukasz Drzycimski

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